Portland Aquarium http://www.portlandaquarium.net Just another Aquarium Sites site Wed, 17 Dec 2014 21:35:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 How to ensure your children’s Aquarium visit is an amazing experience! http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2014/11/21/how-to-ensure-your-childrens-aquarium-visit-is-an-amazing-experience/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2014/11/21/how-to-ensure-your-childrens-aquarium-visit-is-an-amazing-experience/#comments Sat, 22 Sep 2012 14:06:33 +0000 http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/09/22/how-to-ensure-your-childrens-aquarium-visit-is-an-amazing-experience/ Ever had your children say “Mom, watch.  Mom, look at me! Mom, mom, MOM!”  Well, can we share a secret with you?! “Less” is often “More” We have over 2,500 species crawling or swimming around – you don’t have to see it all in one day or rush through. In fact, the more time your […]

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Ever had your children say “Mom, watch.  Mom, look at me! Mom, mom, MOM!”  Well, can we share a secret with you?!

“Less” is often “More”

We have over 2,500 species crawling or swimming around – you don’t have to see it all in one day or rush through. In fact, the more time your child spends in an exhibit the more engaged he can become in sea life, and that engagement leads to deeper education and a richer experience.

“And a little child shall lead them”

Let your children set the pace as you observe their interaction with the variety of sea life.

Children may be interested in things that you might not expect.  Let them delve into that interest. Observe your child enjoying the learning of new things.  Experience the wonder of being a child again, vicariously, through your child.   You will learn about your child’s learning patterns as you observe them.  What is it that captures their attention?  What causes the most wonder in them? Why?   These observations can help you to understand and appreciate your children’s perspective.

Suspend your smart phone addiction for a few hours and the three key words “Location, Location, Location” can transform their meaning.  Here, the only meaning behind those words are  parents disconnected from technology and being not only “on Location” but being “Present, Present, Present.”

You will grow fascinated by their fascinations. They will learn far more about things they are fascinated with than with those things that do not hold their interest. Studies show that when children have a constructive hobby they enjoy, they excel more in other parts of their lives they might not consider “fun”.  This is a rewarding aspect of teaching –  letting them discover the wonder of it for themselves.  Valuable information will be assimilated and retained as your children are given the space and time to explore on their terms, and to know Dad or Mom are present.

So, how might we address the child who says “Mom, mom, look at me!”?  As you visit the Aquarium, watch them!   As amazing as the 500 species we carry may be, we can’t compete with the most fascinating of them all – our children!

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Free Admission to the Portland Aquarium with a School Supply Donation for Underprivileged Kids http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2014/08/23/free-admission-portland-aquarium-school-supply-donation-underprivileged-kids/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2014/08/23/free-admission-portland-aquarium-school-supply-donation-underprivileged-kids/#comments Sat, 23 Aug 2014 18:23:19 +0000 http://www.portlandaquarium.net/?p=9757 PRESS RELEASE Contact: Susan Elcox marketing@austinaquarium.com 503-303-4721 www.portlandaquarium.net Media contact for The Salvation Army- Teresa Steinmetz Director of Communications and Marketing 503-794-3283 Teresa.steinmetz@usw.salvationarmy.org   FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Milwaukie, OR.  August 6, 2014 “Shark Drive for School Supplies” will be held on August 23rd at the Portland Aquarium.  It is a school supply drive to benefit […]

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PRESS RELEASE
Contact: Susan Elcox
marketing@austinaquarium.com
503-303-4721
www.portlandaquarium.net

Media contact for The Salvation Army-
Teresa Steinmetz
Director of Communications and Marketing
503-794-3283
Teresa.steinmetz@usw.salvationarmy.org

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Milwaukie, OR.  August 6, 2014
“Shark Drive for School Supplies” will be held on August 23rd at the Portland Aquarium.  It is a school supply drive to benefit underprivileged youth administered by the Salvation Army.  One free admission will be given for every school supply item donated.

“We have a saying locally at The Salvation Army that it is “All About Kids,” and truly it is. What better way to effect change than to empower them with the tools they need at an early age,” says Major Kenneth Perine, Corps Officer at The Salvation Army Portland Tabernacle.  “Every day we see families struggling to put food on the table, so your donation of school supplies will also take some stress off of parents trying to provide for their children.  We are so grateful for this partnership with the Portland Aquarium and for their generous donation this day!”
You can change a child’s life, one ruler or box of crayons at a time!  Join The Salvation Army and the Portland Aquarium for the Shark Drive for School Supplies!  On August 23, 2014, drop off a donation of new school supplies at the Portland Aquarium and receive 1 free aquarium admission per item donated!  For example, if you are a family or group of 5, bring 5 school supply items and you will all get in for free!  What a great deal!  PLUS, these donations will help provide the tools needed to succeed for underprivileged kids in the Portland area, which will be distributed through The Salvation Army Portland Tabernacle social service offices.  You can drop off the donations anytime during normal business hours (10am-5pm) on Saturday, August 23rd when you bring your family to the Portland Aquarium, located at 6323 SE McLoughlin Blvd, Milwaukie, OR  97267.
Back-to-school shopping can be financially challenging, especially when budgets are already tight.  In many cases, families are struggling to put food on the table, so when back-to-school season rolls around, finding the extra money to buy pencils and paper is difficult.  Together, The Salvation Army and the Portland Aquarium want to make it easier on families, so they don’t have to choose between food on the table and purchasing needed supplies to succeed in school.  “What better way to effect change than to empower them with the tools they need at an early age,” says Major Kenneth Perine, Corps Officer at The Salvation Army Portland Tabernacle.

So as you gear your kids up for school, throw a few extras into the cart and head on down to the Portland Aquarium on August 23rd for a fun, family outing!  Your donation will make a difference to a child in need this school year.

A few links to local school websites reveals some of the needs for K-8.  This list is not exhaustive and does not include needs for grades 9-12.
http://www.pps.k12.or.us/schools/laurelhurst/1780.htm
http://www.pps.k12.or.us/schools/glencoe/365.htm
http://www.pps.k12.or.us/schools/abernethy/613.htm

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About Portland Aquarium:
Portland Aquarium provides children and families access to the excitement and learning opportunities of the ocean without the long trip to the coast. Guests can watch jellyfish float and glow, admire the bright and colorful corals, feel the soft ray on their fingertips, interact with tropical birds and reptiles, … all within easy reach of home.  Portland Aquarium offers multiple educational programs and events for kids, as well as Behind-the-Scenes tours for those curious about what it takes to keep an aquarium in good working order.  Favorite programs include Birthday Parties, Sleep with the Sharks, Octopus Encounters and Morning Rounds.

About The Salvation Army:
The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need in His name without discrimination for 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through the broadest array of social services that range from providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide. The Salvation Army works in 126 countries worldwide.  For more information, or to make a donation, visit us online at www.salvationarmyportland.org.  People wishing to make monetary donations can do so by calling 503.238.GIVE (4483), or by mail, The Salvation Army, 8495 SE Monterey Avenue, Happy Valley, OR 97086-7844.   Friend them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SalvationArmyPortland.

 

SharkDriveforSchoolSuppliesFlyer

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Leopard Shark http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2014/08/18/leopard-shark/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2014/08/18/leopard-shark/#comments Mon, 18 Aug 2014 15:43:58 +0000 http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2014/08/18/leopard-shark/   Fun facts about our Leopard Shark: They have become protected in California and Oregon coasts so that they are not over fished. These types of sharks are most commonly found in sandy or muddy bays and estuaries near the bottom. It is rare to find them in size over 6 feet long. Leopard sharks […]

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Leopard Shark

 

Fun facts about our Leopard Shark:

They have become protected in California and Oregon coasts so that they are not over fished.

These types of sharks are most commonly found in sandy or muddy bays and estuaries near the bottom.

It is rare to find them in size over 6 feet long.

Leopard sharks have a very distinctive pattern when born and look similar to the mammals.

Leopard sharks are ovoviviparous, which means that the eggs hatch within the mother.

They are also known to produce up to 33 pups in a litter.

The Leopard Shark can be found at the Portland Aquarium along with Pyjama Sharks, Wobbegong Sharks and Bamboo Sharks.

 

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Sea Cucumbers http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/08/08/sea-cucumbers/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/08/08/sea-cucumbers/#comments Wed, 08 Aug 2012 21:42:37 +0000 http://oregonaquarium.org/?p=210 Meet our friends, the Sea Cucumbers!   Sea cucumbers are echinoderms from the class holothuroidea. They are marine invertebrates with a leathery skin and an elongated bod. Sea cucumbers are found on the sea floor worldwide. The number of holothurian species worldwide is about 1250 with the greatest number being in the Asia Pacific region.     Many of these […]

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Meet our friends, the Sea Cucumbers!

Oregon Aquarium

 

Sea cucumbers are echinoderms from the class holothuroidea. They are marine invertebrates with a leathery skin and an elongated bod. Sea cucumbers are found on the sea floor worldwide. The number of holothurian species worldwide is about 1250 with the greatest number being in the Asia Pacific region.

 

 

Oregon AquariumMany of these are gathered for human consumption and some species are cultivated in aquaculture systems.  Sea cucumbers serve a useful purpose in the marine ecosystem as they help recycle nutrients, breaking down detritus and other organic matter after which bacteria can continue the degradation process.

 

Oregon Aquarium

 

Like all echinoderms, sea cucumbers have an endoskeleton  just below the skin, calcified structures that are usually reduced to isolated microscopic ossicles (or sclerietes) {say that three times fast!} joined by connective tissue. In some species these can sometimes be enlarged to flattened plates, forming an armour.

 


 

 

 

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Gulper Shark http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/08/03/gulper-shark/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/08/03/gulper-shark/#comments Fri, 03 Aug 2012 20:37:58 +0000 http://oregonaquarium.org/?p=207 Gulper Shark – Centrophorus granulosus from Sharks.org WHAT TO LOOK FOR This shark has a smooth skin (block-shaped denticles wide spaced but not overlapping). It has a rather short and thick snout, and its first dorsal fin is quite short and high, with the second being almost as high with a spine base over its […]

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Gulper Shark – Centrophorus granulosus

from Sharks.org

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

This shark has a smooth skin (block-shaped denticles wide spaced but not overlapping). It has a rather short and thick snout, and its first dorsal fin is quite short and high, with the second being almost as high with a spine base over its inner pelvic fin margins. There is a shallow notch in the postventral caudal fin margin of adults, and the lower lobe is moderately long.

COLOR

Dark grey or grey-brown on top, and lighter below with dusky fin webs and dark fin tips only in the juveniles.GULPER-SHARK-CENTROPHORUS GRANULOSUS

 

SIZE

At birth, the shark is 1 to 1.4 ft [30 to42 cm] in length. Males mature at 2 to 2.6 ft [60 to 80 cm] and females mature over 3 ft [90 cm]. Its maximum length is 3.4 to 3.6 ft [105 to110 cm].

HABITAT

Continental shelves and slopes, on or near the bottom from 164 to 4724.4 ft [50 to1440 m], mostly between 656.2 and1968.5 ft [200 and600 m].

DISTRIBUTION

Widespread in the Atlantic and west Indian Oceans, and the west and possibly central Pacific.

BIOLOGY

Prey – Bony fishes and also squid and crustaceans.

Reproduction – Ovoviviparous, with 1 or 2 pups per litter.

STATUS

Critically endangered regionally off Australia. They are target and bycatch in deepwater fisheries for their liver oil and meat, which has caused population declines.

http://www.sharks.org

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Sea Life Time Lapse http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/16/sea-life-time-lapse/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/16/sea-life-time-lapse/#comments Mon, 16 Jul 2012 22:22:43 +0000 http://oregonaquarium.org/?p=181 The post Sea Life Time Lapse appeared first on Portland Aquarium.

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Giant Octopus Encounter http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/16/giant-octopus-encounter/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/16/giant-octopus-encounter/#comments Mon, 16 Jul 2012 22:03:17 +0000 http://oregonaquarium.org/?p=175 The post Giant Octopus Encounter appeared first on Portland Aquarium.

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Article in the Oregonian http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/16/article-in-the-oregonian/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/16/article-in-the-oregonian/#comments Mon, 16 Jul 2012 21:11:26 +0000 http://oregonaquarium.org/?p=170   Two brothers from Idaho hope to build a marine aquarium geared to children in a former Black Angus Steakhouse south of Milwaukie. In a tour this week, a contractor gutting the 11,000-square-foot building envisioned what could go into the space: a puffin room where a kitchen used to be, touch tanks as you walk […]

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Two brothers from Idaho hope to build a marine aquarium geared to children in a former Black Angus Steakhouse south of Milwaukie.

In a tour this week, a contractor gutting the 11,000-square-foot building envisioned what could go into the space: a puffin room where a kitchen used to be, touch tanks as you walk in the door, perhaps a rainforest room.

Vince Covino, a chiropractic consultant in Boise, said the aquarium could open by winter, but his brother, Ammon Covino, dampened expectations. Ammon Covino, the driving force behind an aquarium that opened in December 2011 in Boise, said he would prefer a building within the city limits of Portland or a bigger location, and that his investment group is looking at locations in three other states, which he declined to reveal.

“These are very expensive projects, and if things don’t go correctly, we don’t want any part of it,” Ammon Covino said.

Ammon Covino recruited Steve Blair, an assistant curator at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, Calif., to be the aquarium’s prospective general manager. He and Blair said they will investigate the community and meet with the landlord next weekend before deciding whether to go ahead.

Clackamas County officials said they informally discussed the aquarium with promoters, but no paperwork has been submitted.

If the investors choose the McLoughlin site, Ammon Covino said they could have plans and a name within 60 days.

Shane Dietz.jpgView full sizeMolly HarbargerContractor Shane Dietz stands in the old Black Angus Steakhouse restaurant, 16323 SE McLoughlin Blvd., where the aquarium might go. The building was also a strip club at one point before a fire damaged the inside.

The building, at 16323 S.E. McLoughlin Boulevard in Oak Grove, sits on two acres and went through several incarnations of restuarant and strip club. A fire that was suspected to be arson caused minor damages, so the Covino brothers sent some contractors who built the Idaho Aquarium to help gut the building.

Whispers of a new aquarium began circulating after a website with the name Oregon Aquarium went live. Specific information has been since taken down, and Ammon Covino said the name, logo and website are not necessarily permanent.

The aquarium, like the non-profit facility in Idaho, would be more hands-on and educational than most. Vince Covino said his children love visiting the Idaho Aquarium because they can pet and feed many of the animals. “They never seem to get sick of it,” Vince Covino said. “I have to drag them out of there when it’s time to go home.”

Oregon aquarium
Prospective site: 16323 S.E. McLoughlin Blvd.
Size: 11,000 square foot building on a 2-acre site
Possible exhibits: puffins, sharks, sea otters, seals, sea turtle, octopus, rainforest room
Zoning: Also allows outdoor exhibits
Audience: Exhibits would be geared toward children about age 10
When: Could open as early as winter 2012

 

One reason for Ammon Covino’s caution in Oregon may be his experience in Idaho.

The nonprofit took about three years to raise the funds and settle on a site, causing concern for people who bought season passes early in the process. The Idaho Aquarium opened seven months ago, before the building was finished and all the marine animals acquired. Shortly after opening, one of the board members pleaded guilty to coral smuggling.

Despite early setbacks, the Covinos say the Idaho aquarium has become successful, drawing about 25,000 visitors per month, including school groups and researchers.

The Covino brothers and Blair says the two aquariums are not linked and won’t be, partly because they chose the for-profit model to speed up the timeline to open in Oregon.

While the plans are preliminary, John Chilson posted support for it on his Oak Grove, OR Facebook page: “Looks like the aquarium in Oak Grove is more than a rumor! We say awesome.”

— Molly Harbarger: 503-294-5923

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A fish may love a bird, but where would they live? http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/09/a-fish-may-love-a-bird-but-where-would-they-live-drew-barrymore/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/09/a-fish-may-love-a-bird-but-where-would-they-live-drew-barrymore/#comments Mon, 09 Jul 2012 15:26:04 +0000 http://oregonaquarium.org/?p=59 A fish may love a bird, but where would they live? {Drew Barrymore} Fish are friends, not food.  {Bruce, Finding Nemo}

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A fish may love a bird, but where would they live?

{Drew Barrymore}

Fish are friends, not food.

 {Bruce, Finding Nemo}

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Sharks http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/05/sharks/ http://www.portlandaquarium.net/2012/07/05/sharks/#comments Thu, 05 Jul 2012 16:54:14 +0000 http://oregonaquarium.org/?p=46 Shark From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Sharks are a group of fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (orSelachii), and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term “shark” has also been used for extinct members of the suborder Elasmobranchii outside the […]

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Shark

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Grey reef shark
Sharks are a group of fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head. Modern sharks are classified within the clade Selachimorpha (orSelachii), and are the sister group to the rays. However, the term “shark” has also been used for extinct members of the suborder Elasmobranchii outside the Selachimorpha, such as Cladoselache and Xenacanthus. Under this broader definition, the earliest known sharks date from more than 420 million years ago.[1]

Since that time, sharks have diversified into over 400 species. They range in size from the small dwarf lanternshark(Etmopterus perryi), a deep sea species of only 17 centimetres (6.7 in) in length, to the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), the largest fish in the world, which reaches approximately 12 metres (39 ft). Despite its size, the whale shark feeds only on planktonsquid, and small fish by filter feeding. Sharks are found in all seas and are common down to depths of 2,000 metres (6,600 ft). They generally do not live in freshwater although there are a few known exceptions, such as the bull shark and the river shark that can survive in both seawater and freshwater.   They breathe through five to seven gill slits. Sharks have a covering of dermal denticles that protects their skin from damage and parasites in addition to improving their fluid dynamics. They also have several sets of replaceable teeth.

Well-known species such as the great white sharktiger sharkblue sharkmako shark, and the hammerhead sharkare apex predators—organisms at the top of their underwater food chain. Their predatory skill fascinates and frightens humans, even though their survival is threatened by human-related activities.

Etymology

Until the 16th century,  sharks were known to mariners as “sea dogs”.   The etymology of the word “shark” is uncertain. One theory is that it derives from theYucatec Maya word xok, pronounced ‘shok’.  Evidence for this etymology comes from the OED, which notes the name “shark” first came into use after Sir John Hawkins‘ sailors exhibited one in London in 1569 and used the word “sharke” to refer to the large sharks of the Caribbean Sea.

An alternate etymology states that the original sense of the word was that of “predator, one who preys on others” from the German Schorck, a variant ofSchurke “villain, scoundrel” (cf. card sharkloan shark, etc.), which was later applied to the fish due to its predatory behaviour.

Anatomy

Drawing of a shark labeling major anatomical features, including mouth, snout, nostril, eye, spiracle, dorsal fin spine, caudal keel, clasper, labial furrows, gill openings, precaudal pit and fins: first and second dorsal, anal, pectoral, caudal and pelvic

General anatomical features of sharks

Teeth

The serrated teeth of a tiger shark, used for sawing through flesh

The teeth of tiger sharks are oblique and serrated to saw through flesh

Shark teeth are embedded in the gums rather than directly affixed to the jaw, and are constantly replaced throughout life. Multiple rows of replacement teeth grow in a groove on the inside of the jaw and steadily move forward in comparison to a conveyor belt; some sharks lose 30,000 or more teeth in their lifetime. The rate of tooth replacement varies from once every 8 to 10 days to several months. In most species, teeth are replaced one at a time as opposed to the simultaneous replacement of an entire row, which is observed in the cookiecutter shark.

Tooth shape depends on the shark’s diet: those that feed on mollusks and crustaceans have dense and flattened teeth used for crushing, those that feed on fish have needle-like teeth for gripping, and those that feed on larger prey such as mammals have pointed lower teeth for gripping and triangular upper teeth with serrated edges for cutting. The teeth of plankton-feeders such as the basking shark are small and non-functional.

Skeleton

Shark skeletons are very different from those of bony fish and terrestrial vertebrates. Sharks and other cartilaginous fish (skates and rays) have skeletons made of cartilage and connective tissue. Cartilage is flexible and durable, yet is about half the normal density of bone. This reduces the skeleton’s weight, saving energy.  Because sharks do not have rib cages, they can easily be crushed under their own weight on land.

Jaw

Jaws of sharks, like those of rays and skates, are not attached to the cranium. The jaw’s surface (in comparison to the shark’s vertebrae and gill arches) needs extra support due to its heavy exposure to physical stress and its need for strength. It has a layer of tiny hexagonal plates called “tesserae“, which are crystalblocks of calcium salts arranged as a mosaic.  This gives these areas much of the same strength found in the bony tissue found in other animals.

Generally sharks have only one layer of tesserae, but the jaws of large specimens, such as the bull sharktiger shark, and the great white shark, have two to three layers or more, depending on body size. The jaws of a large great white shark may have up to five layers.  In the rostrum (snout), the cartilage can be spongy and flexible to absorb the power of impacts.

Fins

Fin skeletons are elongated and supported with soft and unsegmented rays named ceratotrichia, filaments of elastic protein resembling the horny keratin in hairand feathers.  Most sharks have eight fins. Sharks can only drift away from objects directly in front of them because their fins do not allow them to move in the tail-first direction.

What is your favorite shark and why?

Also check out Portland Aquarium’s latest educational display features new sharks that are known as juvenile epaulette sharks, also known as “Walking Sharks.”

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